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Archive for the ‘Market and Economic Commentary’ Category

 

Market Solutions – May: Dollar strength re-emerges, reversing some of the rand gains since December 2017

By Rob Price on May 11, 2018 in Market and Economic Commentary

Newswires have been dominated by the aptly named “Trump Tariffs” after the Trump presidency introduced steel tariffs specifically targeted at Chinese steel producers.

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Market Solutions – April: What’s concerning the markets; Trade Wars or Cyclical Dusk?

By Rob Price on Apr 16, 2018 in Market and Economic Commentary

Newswires have been dominated by the aptly named “Trump Tariffs” after the Trump presidency introduced steel tariffs specifically targeted at Chinese steel producers.

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Market Solutions – February: Global central banks may no longer be an investor’s “friend”.

By Rob Price on Mar 16, 2018 in Market and Economic Commentary

Since the 2008 financial crisis we have seen a divergence between financial market returns and the real economy, where growth assets such as equities have provided strong returns despite weak real economic activity – usually the primary source of asset market returns. The chief cause for this divergence is the active role taken by major central banks in the global economy, the inflationary impact on asset prices and the inability to meet the intended target, real economic growth.

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Market Solutions – January: Volatility surfaces as “goldilocks conditions” questioned.

By Rob Price on Feb 13, 2018 in Market and Economic Commentary

Most investors are well aware of the strong returns experienced by the equity markets in 2017 on the back of rising growth and inflation expectations. The US S&P500 and the All Share Index (ALSI) both gained more than 20% during the year, while the MSCI Emerging Market Index gained north of 30%.
Economic growth and inflation primarily drove the gains. However, as we have stated for some time, a significant portion of the gains were based on expectations rather than outcomes.

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